Paperless


 

In a world where humans have a physical, a mental and a spiritual nature, so much is silent in public discourse on the spiritual.  At least that side of the spiritual nature which seems to me as real as the clouds.  Even though you cannot touch the cloud, they are there, constantly moving, affecting vision on any given day.  Sometimes fogging neighborhood or the entire region in. 

 

This generation is growing up in a world with less and less human contact.  That sense of touch is a lot more cold in the business world.   The irony is that the world, with e-mails, with voice messaging, is moving to even less human contact at a cost of cheapening the value of human life, in which business is seen as the cause.  It was and is all about greater production.   

 

“I am back to work as an office temp.  This change is affecting me,  deeply.  Mostly I am so weirded out.  I don’t know how to describe the weirdness.  Like episodes of Office Space, there is actual dialog but here no one introduces themselves.  They just look at me, they know I am an outsider, not worthy of an introduction. They over hear me speaking on the phone, “I have no idea.  I am sorry.  I’m just a temp.’”

 

With less and less human contact, people act as if they did not have a soul.  Maybe it was an every day belief, “I am just a temp.”  I made a number of trips in the early 1990s to countries formerly under the domination of the Soviet Bloc.  And the further east I traveled, the cheaper life seemed to be.  That cheapness was pervasive in all the world now, as more and more people pretended to work, as they had in Russia, where they only pretended to receive an income.    

  

Have you ever read a genealogy website, where people went in search of a great grandmother?  In one case, there was Margaret Murphy, born about 1832 in Kilkenny (possibly Castlecomer), who later married a British Soldier named John Nelson.  And then what?  Margaret was dispersed with a new name, a new country?  And she had an affect on her subsequent great grandchildren that she never knew?  On that genealogy website too was also a note of a father in Ontario now in search of his son in western Canada.  Where many of us were looking for an identity from the past to determine who we are and our destination, this man seemed to be looking for his future.

  

For most adults, the most difficult thing to teach to a child is how to pray.  It really did not seem much different than meeting a new lover for the first time.  So what was the attraction of one for the other?  And how was an attraction communicated?  Mostly it seemed to be in the questioning of each other.  In the days ahead I am going to focus on the role of questioning in a relationship which Elie Wiesal shows in his book, Sages and Dreamers.    

 

Of late, Paperlessworld has focused here on the spiritual dimension of life, and the struggle to establish an identity.  Paperlessworld here has accented the things all around us that used to be missed, by me anyway.  Discussion of identities, national or spiritual ones, was nothing but reflecting on the human souls.  Now If I had missed it, I think there is a good chance the other one billion Catholics in the world, the other Christians with or without denominations, might have too.  That spiritual world was a lot like the weather, where it was not the heat but the humidity, those Santa Anita winds, El Nino, El Nina, global warming, and the invisible.  We woke up to it every day.  The invisible.  In Minnesota, in Canada, and along all of its border, you learn at a young age that 85% of body heat escapes through the head.  I had reached the point that I thought the same applied to the spiritual within.  Like the weather, the spiritual was felt, if not seen.  Until finally it affected you every day.  And maybe one day your descendants.  I thought it was time to capture some of that spiritual body heat.  Because it was gonna be another long winter. 

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